Four lessons any manager can learn from the Masters Golf Tournament – Part 1 1

2012 Masters Tournament

Some people actually yawn when the subject of golf comes up. I was a caddy at age 11 and began playing at age 12, so I am not one of those people. In high school, I was the guy out at daybreak, carrying my clubs and playing up to 54 holes before they would kick me off the Newport News Deer Run Municipal Golf Course well after dark. I have learned many lessons from golf over the years. Most involve humility.

Even if you are not a golfer,  there are four great lessons any manager can take away from a major golf tournament:

  1. Preparation-  for any major event this is the key to success
  2. “Drive for Show” – getting  recognition as an expert
  3. “Putt for Dough” – If you can’t close the deal…
  4. “Amen Corner “ – There’s always that one moment…

Today I will address Preparation. Right now there are 96 golfers competing for the coveted green jacket. Some of the contenders include household names like Tiger Woods, Tom Watson and Phil Mickleson. There are a dozen ways to get an invitation, but the top four are:

  • Win a Masters
  • Win a US Open
  • Win the British Open or PGA Championship
  • Be an Amateur champion

Preparing to win the Masters means you are already a winner. It is the best of the best. As a manager, your take-away from this is simple. Success begets success.  Prove your abilities and you will be recognized. Yet some managers don’t get it.

I have seen many potentially winning managers settle for mediocrity because they weren’t going to do the job until they were paid for it. They miss the fact that managers being promoted are the ones already doing their bosses job. So when their experience met opportunity, they passed up the chance to compete at a higher level.

The lead at Augusta has changed several times since the first golfers teed off at 7:50AM this morning.  It will be late Sunday night, after the field is narrowed, that the final victor will emerge. I look forward to the competition and what I will learn from the golfers.

Join me over the next four days, even if you are not a golfer. By Sunday night, you just might be a better manager. And as always, I welcome you comments.

Job hunting is a delicate balance – Here are three ways to cope 1

Are You Stressing Over Your Job Search?

“Job hunting is a delicate balance between pride, desperation and humiliation.”        Amy Crabtree

Here are three ways to cope:

  1. Don’t stop- You may have found a lead to the best job on the planet and you’re sure after the telephone interview that next week will be it because they scheduled an interview. Now you have six days to kill until the interview, so you start thinking why should I keep looking, this job is in the bag. Instead of stopping your job search, pause for a few minutes, write down everything you remember from the phone interview, especially things that got a positive response and then keep searching. It  doesn’t matter if this job works out,  you have many more coming. Don’t stop until you are in a new hire orientation
  2. Don’t marry the company - I’ve said many times before, you can end up on an emotional roller coaster if you play the “I’ve got to have this job, it’s perfect” game. All jobs have perks, benefits and all jobs have drawbacks. Make sure you are painting a realistic picture of the company;  you may decide after the first interview that you don’t like their culture. Be open about the company and realistic about what they are offering and your stress will be less.
  3. Don’t think traditional – With all of the competition for jobs today, standing out is imperative. In the end, it’s about getting the attention of the company you want to work for. Within the corporate culture of the industry and workplace you are targeting, you need to tell your story. Share your personal brand with specific stories that give the interviewer a reason to remember you.

Amy caught the spirit of the problem. “Job hunting is a delicate balance between pride, desperation and humiliation.” Don’t be so proud that you stop searching because “they would be nut’s not to hire you”. Don’t be so desperate that you take the first thing that comes along, without making sure it is a good fit for you. And don’t worry about being embarrassed when you market yourself in a memorable way. It may end up being the talk of your first company picnic.

 

On April Fool’s Day – Are you fooling yourself about the Job Interview? 4

Is the joke on you?

When my children were teenagers, their running April Fool’s Day joke at our house was to take a rubber band and put it on the hand sprayer attachment on the kitchen sink. When my wife or I would turn on the faucet in the morning to make coffee, we would get sprayed with cold water.  Getting fooled by your children, even when you know it’s coming, is harmless fun. Fooling yourself is something different.

On April Fools’ Day, I keep thinking about why people would fool themselves about a job interview?  I’ve said before that there are five things you must do to be successful in an interview: research the company, relate specific stories about how you have; increased sales, decreased expenses and improved customer service and finally you must give yourself permission to have the job. The more I speak with people about their job interviews, the more I feel people are glossing over the permission part

On some level, they do not feel they deserve the job. As the interview progresses, their concerns about their self-worth leak out in unexpected ways and this sabotages the interview. This is bad. But the good news is your attitude can be changed once you realize where it comes from.

For me, I have always been an optimist. Very early on I bought into the glass half full; I mean it just seemed to make more sense to me than the reverse. Not that the glass half empty people weren’t right too. The fact that we could both look at the glass, see it in two different ways and both are right was exciting. The lesson for me is my view of the world and my place in it is controlled by how I chose to view it.

Recently I realized that my view  was being filtered by my accumulated life experiences;  the teachers I had in school, the lessons I learned from my parents, where I lived growing up  and even the books I read. All of this blended together to make my personal filter, my lenses through which I saw the world. Having this knowledge of how I viewed my life gave me the power to change things that weren’t working for me. Once you understand why you think the way you do about yourself, you are on your way to accepting yourself, which is very important, and then addressing anything that is holding you back.

So are you fooling yourself about the job? Do you really feel you deserve it? If so, your chances of landing it are very high. If not, then the interview will be an April fool’s joke, only you will be the one getting sprayed with cold water.