10 Ways To Win An Oscar (I Mean Land A Job) 0

and the award goes to (I mean the job goes to...)...

and the award goes to… (I mean the job goes to…)

I Google searched 10 ways to win an Oscar. With many thanks to everyone on-line who submitted a Top 10 List, the Oscar goes to Rick Schwartz for his list:  It’s Easy To Win An Oscar!

Here is Rick’s Top 10, re-packaged with my job tips:

  1. Be A World-Class Schmoozer - Be a real person and treat everyone you meet politely. Make sure you start with the receptionist.
  2. Don’t Be Ugly - Dress for the interview and make sure you are groomed. Leave the t-shirt and torn jeans at home.
  3. Cast A Has-Been – Everyone loves a come-back story. Show how you overcame an obstacle to achieve a goal.
  4. Do Something Scandalous  -The Facebook photo of you drunk, singing on top of a bar is the wrong type of scandalous. Think of something positive you have done. Stand out with a success story related to the requirements of the job.
  5. Live In Los Angeles - Rick talks about doing things in the town where the Oscars are awarded. Contributing time to a volunteer project in your town is a point in your favor.
  6. Show Up Everywhere  - Networking is still one of the best ways to land a new job. Make sure you are out there.
  7. Don’t Be Afraid To Get Dirty – You might want to stay away from this one. Once you start exaggerating your qualifications on a resume, it’s a slippery slope. Even if you land the job, someone will eventually find out. Don’t go there.
  8. Hire The Professional Goons – Sometimes an objective, outside opinion about your resume or your interviewing skills is needed. A small investment in a career coach and professionally crafted resume is often the difference between multiple job offers and a prolonged job search.
  9. Take Credit For Everything – Do not be afraid to toot your own horn. If you don’t believe in your ability to land the job, neither will the interviewer.
  10. Make An Amazing Movie – With a professionally crafted resume, scripting and a bit of rehearsing (ideally in front of a video camera),you can be amazing. All of your experience packaged correctly can make you the only logical choice.

Follow my ideas and be ready to accept the Oscar (I mean the job offer).

Want a job? Four reasons you must follow-up 0

Recently I presented my “You’re Hired” keynote for the New Jersey Department Of Labor’s Jersey Job Club

Interview, job search requires thank you notesThere were many excellent  questions both before and after my presentation. One stood out in my mind. Tim (not his real name) asked:

“Why should  I spend money to send a thank-you card if I felt the interviewer was not interested in me?”

Several audience members almost jumped out of their seats. Each said the cost of a stamp and five minutes of their time was minimal compared to the potential of a job offer. One person told of getting a call after sending a thank you note. In the note,  she had offered several suggestions to a problem the interviewer had told her the company was facing. She ended up landing the job.

Tim’s question reminded me of a job offer I once received after sending a thank you card and later following up with a phone call. I was immediately asked to come to the office and was hired  when I walked in the door. I was actually told by the interviewer  that my follow-up was the reason I was offered the job. It was the final test.

Back at the Jersey Job Club, I spoke with Tim.  He was missing the point about what a thank you note is about.

  • Tim did not see the chance to add value by sending the note.
  • He did not see the chance to separate himself from other candidates by highlighting an aspect of the interview.
  • He did not see he could share additional information about something the interviewer asked.
  •  Tim did not see that he could include information about a shared hobby, his answer to a company challenge that was discussed or an idea sparked by the interviewers questions.

A few days later, I received an email from Tim. He had re-thought the ideas we had discussed. He saw the value of consistent, specific, follow-up. Tim said he is now investing in his future when he mails a card.

Following up with a snail mail card is more than an obligation. It is a chance to stand out, to show your value to  an employer. Done right, the next thing you sign after the thank you card will be all of the forms during your new hire orientation.