marketing

Three job seeker truths you may not want to hear 0

Pick-MeTradition has it that getting a job is about “me getting a job.” The fact that it involves an employer, someone who will give me a job, is secondary.

Here are three truths you must understand or you will not land the job:

  1. It’s not about you – In reality, the job search is about solving the problem an employer has. It doesn’t matter that you want the job, it matters if they want you. Qualified is different from desirable. The employer must see you as part of their team, as one of them. Unless you understand the culture, they will not see you fitting in.
  2. You are saying too much – Listing job titles and descriptions is a sure way to land your resume in the circular file cabinet. Starting with a career objective statement will produce yawns. Responsible for, duties included and managed… fill the page without saying anything to capture the imagination of the reader.
  3. You are not saying enough - Not having an attention grabbing, brand/value proposition at the top of your resume gives no reason to go on. Not giving specific, measurable examples of success leave the reader wondering what you actually do. Not knowing the employers needs and not tying the solution to you makes the interviewer say “next.”

Job search success today is more than “spray and pray.” Getting the right information with the right specifics to the right people can take weeks or months off a job search. Simply addressing these three truths will set you apart from the cookie cutter, on-line free resume template crowd.

Not facing these truths will make it hard to hear “you’re hired.”

Can you create a Brand in only four words ? Charlie did. 0

Joel Quass, Professional Speaker and Author talks about Branding

Traveling north or south near Saluda on Route 17 in rural Virginia, you can’t miss the sign in the yard. Measuring a generous eight feet tall by 20 feet long, a white plywood background with blue 3-d lettering, it’s just four words:  Charlie Carter Cleans Chimneys.

As a former chimney sweep I have kept track of Charlie over the years. Charlie’s sign has been in his front yard (you’ve got to love the local zoning laws) for over 30 years. Charlie Carter was a brand before branding was cool. There is no phone number. Everything you need is there. At 55 mph (you can’t really go faster in front of his house because the road makes a sweeping bend as you pass the driveway) you know who he is and what he does.

Curious if Charlie has kept up with the times, I Goggled “Charlie Carter Cleans Chimneys.” Guess what I found?

  1. Charlie Carter Cleans Chimneys | Saluda, VA 23149 | Angies List

www.angieslist.com › Local Reviews › Saluda

Reviews you can trust on Charlie Carter Cleans Chimneys from Angie’s List members | 12180 Tidewater Trl Saluda, VA.

 

  1. Charlie Carter Cleans Chimneys, Saluda, VA – Manta

www.manta.com/c/mm60wbd/charlie-carter-cleans-chimneys

12180 Tidewater Trail, Saluda, VA, 23149-2539. Phone: (804) 435-3600. Category:Chimney Builders & Repairers. View detailed profile, contacts, maps, reports 

 

Charlie comes up as 1 – 10 on the first page. All with just four words.

Think about what you can do for your company in four words. Is your marketing this precise? Is your business this focused? Most people cannot describe what they do in four minutes, yet Charlie has done it in four words.

The same holds true in a job search. Can you share your Brand, your Value Statement (the answer to why should I hire you) in the equivalent of six tweets or less? Six 140 character sentences is about the length of an elevator pitch. If you can’t get someone’s attention during the elevator ride up, you should stay in the lobby.

Charlie has inspired me to once examine my brand, to challenge myself to say more with less. I encourage you to do the same. It has certainly paid off for Charlie.

Managers – Are you paying enough attention? 4

Lessons from the Worst-Performing Companies in America
What’s caused U.S. firms to lose the most shareholder value in the last 10 years? A new Booz study — actually, a repeat of one it did in 2004 — once again came up with the same result

As I read this article, my mind flashed back to my years with Best Products Co. Inc. I had joined them right out of college. I was hired as an entry level Department Manager, but within a year I was a Store Manager for the company. I managed seven stores in as many years, moving frequently for the company.

After arriving in Hampton, Virginia, there was talk among our Senior VP’s of my taking on a District Manager role. Life was great and the possibilities limit-less. Then we bought Modern Merchandising.

We went from a one billion dollar company to a two billion dollar company over night. Everyone was very excited. In fact, we even had T-shirts made.  And our Senior Management spent the next twelve months assimilating the acquisition into the company.

We changed the names on our buildings; out with Dolgins, Miller Sales and the rest, in with the Best Products logo’s. We consolidated distribution centers, creating new efficiencies and re-aligned regional support offices.

The entire process took 12 months. And then we were ready.

But in the past twelve months, retail customers had gone off in a new direction. We had been so busy focusing on the acquisition and re-structuring that no one noticed our customer base was  leaving.

When I saw the hand writing on the wall, I left , purchasing the vending company I would sell two years later.

Every time I think things are running really well in my business I have a  flash back to my Best Products days. The lesson I learned then has stuck with me for over 25 years. So please, pay attention to your business.  

Who Should Think Big? 1

Are You Thinking Big?

Traveling to Yorktown, Virginia from New Jersey, I cross the Potomac River on Route 301. Three miles from the river, at the top of a rather steep hill, is a furniture and carpet shop. The shop has been in business for decades. I’ve been driving this road for 21 years, but the store never stood out in my mind until….

On a recent trip, I saw a giant chair in front of the store. I had a flashback to Lily Tomlin and a character she developed that sat in a humongous rocker. Now, as I cross the bridge into Virginia from Maryland, I am anticipating the chair.

I might have the radio on but I’m concentrating on the road as the two lane Potomac River Bridge is very narrow and Route 301 is a major tractor-trailer highway. Then, out of the blue, a vision of the chair flashes in my mind. I think, “is it still there”? As I drive up that steep hill from the riverbed area up onto the rolling hills, I spot the chair at the front of the parking lot.

I don’t think I will ever drive this section of highway without thinking about this chair. Thinking BIG paid off for this business. I certainly remember them.

Everyone should think big. In business, stores don’t take 75 cents off a $300 TV, they slash prices to the bone! As a candidate for a job, you don’t say you can do slightly better than the next guy, you spell out the tremendous skills you have and then share stories that highlight those skills. As a parent, you don’t encourage children to be average, but to reach for the stars, to follow their dreams. Even in our personal relationships, there’s a place for thinking big.

If you are ever on Route 301 in Virginia, between the Potomac River Bridge and where Route 3 crosses it leading into Fredericksburg, look for the chair. And when you are going to do something, choose to do it BIG. Big gets remembered!

Four lessons any manager can learn from the Masters Golf Tournament – Part 2 0

Bubba Watson

Get their attention  or in golf parlance – ” Drive for Show “

-  In golf, people are drawn to the long hitters. On the PGA tour Bubba Watson has the longest carry distance, averaging 304.7 yards, his longest overall was 345.00. After two rounds at Augusta, Bubba Watson is tied for third. Not bad!  Bubba crushed his drive on 13 yesterday which  set up a great iron shot to within six feet of the hole. Then the putter yipped and he missed an eagle, settling for a birdie.

One way to be recognized as an expert  manager is to understand and solve the problems of your employees. Employees are drawn to the managers that can solve their problems. Your knowledge and expertise attract them.  This doesn’t mean giving them all the answers, it means giving them the tools they need to be successful.

Michael Quinlan, as President of McDonald’s Corporation said that “one of the most important aspects of his job – and one he spends approximately  one-third of his time – was cutting red tape.”  This clears the way for your employee to do what he or she was hired to do.

So in the end Bubba didn’t  make the putt and it cost him a stroke.  Tomorrow we will look at getting the job done; making the clutch putt.  Being recognized as an expert is only the beginning;  now you must prove it.

Tiger Woods wins PGA Event after 923 day drought – Can your business bounce back from a major set-back? 0

923 days later, back in business

As you can see from his website, Tiger Woods is a business. Like all businesses, his customers make him successful. On a fateful night in November, several years ago, he lost the trust of many of his customers (fans). Then there was the famous news conference and the rehab. His business lost sponsors. For those first few months it seemed like Tiger Woods as a business was over.

Yesterday all the newscasters could talk about was the new Tiger. One pointed out that many golfers have an initial burst of success, followed by a plateau, followed by a second wave of success in the sport.  Tiger’s initial burst of success included winning 71 PGA tournaments and the Arnold Palmer six times. His win yesterday is what is surely the first of many more as Tiger Woods continues to take the steps needed to once again be successful on the golf course.

As I watched Tiger play the final holes yesterday, my mind shot to the chapter in Peter Shankman’s book, Customer Service – New Rules for a Social Media World. In chapter five Peter talks about Stopping Small Problems From Becoming Big Problems.  On February 19, 2010, one of the headlines was “Will Tiger Woods quit golf for good?” That same day Tiger held a Press Conference. “People learned more about Tiger in the past 15 minutes” than they have through his whole career, said Geek Factory CEO Peter Shankman on Fox News.

After the news conference, Religion reporter Cathy Lynn Grossman outlined her thoughts on how Tiger could recover from this; Admit your wrongs, take responsibility for them, express your regrets to all who were harmed, and spell out your path to return to integrity and righteousness.

No one likes to think that something bad will happen to their business, but not having a plan on how to handle set-backs is bad. By thinking ahead about the unthinkable, you  may be able to minimize the damage, keep your customers and even turn them into raving fans in the end.

So it’s on to Augusta as the new Tiger continues to reinvent himself, both on and off the golf course.

“Not in this economy!” That’s not why I buy 7

I was speaking with a vendor who services many supermarkets. He was talking about how his sales have changed since 2008. As the subject of advertising came up, I asked him how effective  POP (point of sale) signage is in this economy. It seemed to me that this would be a great way for people to see the value in an item as they were making their selection.

My friend had a different view.  He said:

“People aren’t buying POP ads anymore; not in this economy. People are shopping with a calculator.”

An informal poll among two or three shoppers in the aisle did not reveal any evidence either way, so I thought I would put the question to you, my readers. Please take a moment and let me know your thoughts. Not that I am competitive, but I can’t wait to see who is right.